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Monday, 14 September 2020 00:00

If you have a blister on your foot, you may feel tempted to pop the fluid-filled pocket under your skin. Should you? The general consensus is that you probably shouldn’t. A blister is filled with serum, the liquid part of your blood that contains protective substances like antibodies. Popping or draining your blister removes the serum and makes a hole in your skin, opening the area up to infection. Popping the blister can also cause more pain than simply having an intact blister on your foot. Additionally, it is very important to avoid popping your foot blister if you have diabetes, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, swollen legs, venous ulcers, or a condition that affects your immune system, as these things can increase your chances of getting an infection. If you have a painful foot blister, it is recommended that you visit a podiatrist for treatment. 

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 08 September 2020 00:00

Heel pain can be a common issue that a lot of runners experience. The style of your running stride, as well as overuse, can be factors in why you may be experiencing heel pain, however certain conditions may also be the cause. Fallen arches, or flat feet, as they're more commonly referred to, can create heel pain after a run due to the misshapen structure of the feet. The lack of an arch may put added stress or strain on the plantar fascia. The role of the plantar fascia is to connect the heel bone to the toes. If this tears, or becomes inflamed, another common heel condition known as plantar fasciitis may develop. For more information on what conditions may affect your heels, especially for runners, please consult with a podiatrist.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Ingrown toenails occur when the nail grows into the skin surrounding it. While they generally occur on the big toe, they can affect any toe. One common cause of ingrown toenails is the shape of the nail. This can be hereditary. Nails that become more broad at the top of the toes or nails that are naturally curly have a tendency to push into the skin. Trauma to the toenail or wearing shoes that are too tight can also lead to ingrown toenails. Signs of an ingrown toenail include redness around the side of the toe near the nail, swelling of the toe, and liquid seeping from the side of the nail. Because ingrown toenails are prone to infection, it is important to visit a podiatrist especially if an ingrown toenail persists.   

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor blood flow to the lower extremities. This is due to a buildup of plaque along the walls of the arteries, causing them to narrow and become stiff and thus restricting blood flow. According to a recent study, people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disorder that affects the joints, appear to be at an increased risk of developing PAD. Fortunately, both PAD and RA can be managed. A podiatrist can screen for PAD and recommend treatment options for both conditions. If you have poor circulation to your lower limbs or arthritic joint pain in your feet and ankles, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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