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January 2022

Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

What Happens During an ABI Test?

An Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) test is a fast, relatively painless, and non-invasive screening measure used to detect a person’s risk of having peripheral artery disease or other problems with blood flow in the lower limbs. During an ABI test, your doctor will use a blood pressure cuff to measure the blood pressure at various locations along your calves, feet, and toes, as well as at your upper arms. These measures are then used to calculate a ratio that corresponds to your risk of having impaired circulation. You may feel slight, momentary discomfort while your blood pressure is taken, but this test has no other risks or complications associated with it. For more information about ABI tests, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Your Baby’s Foot Development

If you’ve ever stopped to look at your baby’s feet, you’ve likely noticed that they are different from a typical adult’s feet. Rather than being born with fully-formed, mini adult feet, children’s feet go through several stages of development. At birth, a baby’s feet are soft and flat. Their bones start out as pieces of cartilage and their toes are almost all equal in length and surrounded by a layer of fat. From 9 to 24 months, a baby’s feet will still be flat, but their bones are slowly developing with gaps between them. At age 2 and beyond, the soft fat in the foot will slowly start to disappear, and the arches of the feet will become visible. The small foot bones develop further, eventually merging so that each foot contains 26 bones. To learn more about healthy foot development and how to best care for your baby’s feet, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Making sure that your children maintain good foot health is very important as they grow. If you have any questions, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

Having healthy feet during childhood can help prevent medical problems later in life, namely in the back and legs. As children grow, their feet require different types of care. Here are some things to consider...

Although babies do not walk yet, it is still very important to take care of their feet.

Avoid putting tight shoes or socks on his or her feet.

Allow the baby to stretch and kick his or her feet to feel comfortable.

As a toddler, kids are now on the move and begin to develop differently. At this age, toddlers are getting a feel for walking, so don’t be alarmed if your toddler is unsteady or ‘walks funny’. 

As your child gets older, it is important to teach them how to take care of their feet.

Show them proper hygiene to prevent infections such as fungus.

Be watchful for any pain or injury.

Have all injuries checked by a doctor as soon as possible.

Comfortable, protective shoes should always be worn, especially at play.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Do to Keep Your Child’s Feet Healthy
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Published in Blog

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection of the skin on the feet. While it usually causes itching, burning, stinging, and peeling skin, sometimes a person can have athlete’s foot with no symptoms at all. In those cases, the person will likely be unaware that they have an infection. Some people may have only very mild symptoms, and mistake athlete’s foot for dry skin on the soles of their feet. Athlete’s foot can be very contagious, capable of spreading from person to person and from one part of the body to another. If you suspect that you may have athlete’s foot, it is strongly suggested that you see a podiatrist for proper treatment. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Published in Blog
Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

The Consequences of Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a common foot deformity in which one or more of the smaller toes bends upward at the middle joint, giving the toe a hammer-like shape. This deformity is caused by an imbalance between the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles surrounding the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints in the toes. Hammertoes are not just unsightly, they can also be painful. The tops of the toes may rub against your shoes while you walk, causing the toes to become callused. The irregular shape of the toes can make it difficult to find comfortable, well-fitting shoes. In some cases, the hammertoes can also alter your gait as you consciously or unconsciously make changes to the way you walk in order to avoid toe pain or keep your shoes on your feet. Hammertoes worsen over time if they are left untreated. If you have hammertoes, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that occurs due to an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments that normally hold the toe straight. It can be caused by the type of shoes you wear, your foot structure, trauma, and certain disease processes.

Symptoms

  • Painful and/or difficult toe movement
  • Swelling
  • Joint stiffness
  • Calluses/Corns
  • Physical deformity

Risk Factors

  • Age – The risk of hammertoe increases with age
  • Sex – Women are more likely to have hammertoe compared to men
  • Toe Length – You are more likely to develop hammertoe if your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Certain Diseases – Arthritis and diabetes may make you more likely to develop hammertoe

Treatment

If you have hammertoe, you should change into a more comfortable shoe that provides enough room for your toes. Exercises such as picking up marbles may strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. Nevertheless, it is important to seek assistance from a podiatrist in order to determine the severity of your hammertoe and see which treatment option will work best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Hammertoe
Published in Blog
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