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March 2021

Cuboid syndrome occurs when the cuboid bone in the midfoot is partially dislocated, usually due to a trauma or injury. This results in symptoms such as pain on the outside of your foot, redness near the area of injury, swelling, tenderness, weakness, a reduced range of motion, and difficulty walking. Cuboid syndrome is more likely to occur in people who engage in frequent, repetitive activities that put strain on the foot. Participating in sports that involve a lot of running, jumping, or side to side movements, such as basketball or ballet, can put you at an increased risk of injuring the cuboid bone. Cuboid syndrome is also often associated with ankle sprains. If you are experiencing the symptoms of cuboid syndrome, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

Can Vascular Disease Affect the Foot?

The normal flow of blood to and from various parts of the body does not occur in people with vascular disease—a condition known to damage blood vessels and reduce circulation in the foot. In Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), there is a failure in transporting oxygen away from the heart, with symptoms such as tingling and numbness in your feet and legs, cold feet, and also a tingling sensation when you walk. You are more at risk of developing PAD if you smoke, have diabetes, high cholesterol, or high blood pressure. Your feet are often indicators of problems in other areas of your body, which is why it is important to be diagnosed early and treated properly by a podiatrist to avoid complications such as cardiovascular disease or severe blockages in the arteries of the legs (critical limb ischemia)—both of which may lead to a heart attack or stroke.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 17 March 2021 00:00

Heel Pain Can Be Treated!

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

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People with diabetes often suffer from diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage causing numbness, tingling, sensitivity, and the inability to feel pain. This condition, along with circulatory problems also prevalent in diabetes sufferers, can lead to diabetic ulcers. Diabetic, or neurotrophic, ulcers are typically found at the bottom of the foot where pressure is applied. A loss of sensitivity and feeling in the feet can make people with diabetes unaware that calluses, cracks, or an infection is occurring—making it vitally important for them to inspect their feet daily. If you have numbness, pain, or a wound on your foot that will not heal, make an appointment right away with a podiatrist to have the situation properly diagnosed and treated.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 08 March 2021 00:00

Who Does Sever’s Disease Affect?

The growth plate in the heel is commonly injured among children and young teenagers that frequently participate in running and jumping activities. Injury to the growth plate can lead to a condition that is known as Sever’s disease, which can cause pain and discomfort. Along with injury, this condition can develop as a result of different growth rates as the bones, muscles, and tendons mature. Common symptoms of Sever’s disease can include stiffness in the heel area and the heel may appear to be red. Elevating the affected foot may bring mild relief, and it can help to temporarily stop the activity that caused this condition. Additionally, some patients find it helpful to wear an elastic wrap which may provide necessary support as the healing process occurs. If you notice your child is limping, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who is able to treat Sever’s disease.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

Flat Feet Can Affect Children and Adults

The absence or lack of an arch in the foot can indicate a condition that is referred to as flat feet. The majority of babies are born with flat feet, and the arch generally develops at around two or three years old. Some children notice pain in their feet which could be a result of having flat feet. It may become worse after standing, walking, or running for extended periods of time. Flat feet are more visible when the child is standing up and the inside of the foot is shown to clearly lay flat on the floor. In adults, rheumatoid arthritis may cause this ailment. This specific type of arthritis may lead to deformities in the joints and can affect the feet. If you or your child has flat feet, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can effectively monitor this condition.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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