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December 2020

Monday, 28 December 2020 00:00

Signs That Foot Wounds Should Be Checked

An ulcer that develops on the foot is a wound that may not heal. This type of ailment can cause severe pain and discomfort and is common among diabetic patients. Redness on and around the affected area is often the first sign of a foot wound, and additional symptoms can include an unpleasant odor and possible drainage. There are several reasons why foot wounds may occur. These can consist of living a sedentary lifestyle, nerve damage, or circulation problems. Additionally, medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes may make developing wounds on the feet more likely. If you are prone to foot wounds, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat this problem.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 21 December 2020 00:00

Leg and Foot Cramps During Pregnancy

Pregnant women often experience foot pain, and a common ailment during pregnancy can include leg cramps. They may develop as a result of shortened calf muscles, and they can cause severe pain and discomfort. Additional reasons why foot cramps can develop may be from a vitamin deficiency, or an imbalance in electrolytes. This type of pain generally occurs in the third trimester, and will gradually diminish once the baby is born. Relief may be attained when the affected leg is stretched, and the foot is rotated several times in clockwise and counterclockwise directions. If you would like additional information on why leg cramps can occur during pregnancy, and how to prevent them, please consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 14 December 2020 00:00

How Do I Know if I Broke My Toe?

A broken toe is typically the result of trauma. Some examples include stubbing your toe against a piece of furniture, dropping something on your toe, or forcefully bending the toe while playing sports. In some cases small but repetitive injuries to the toe, especially from exercises like running and jumping, can cause a small crack to form in the bone known as a stress fracture. Symptoms of a broken toe include pain that worsens when the affected toe is moved or touched, swelling, bruising, and a decreased range of motion. You may hear a snap or pop in the toe at the time of injury which indicates that the bone may be affected. In more serious cases, the affected toe may look deformed, be pointed in the wrong direction, or be twisted outside of its normal position. Broken toes are diagnosed through physical examination and X-rays. If you believe you have broken your toe it is recommended that you seek the care of a podiatrist.   

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 07 December 2020 00:00

What’s Causing My Lateral Foot Pain?

Pain felt on the outer side of the foot, or lateral foot pain, is often indicative of the condition known as cuboid syndrome. Trauma to the foot, or gradual repetitive force can cause the cuboid bone to shift out of place. Along with lateral foot pain, common symptoms of cuboid syndrome may include tenderness and swelling, difficulty walking, and pain that can worsen over time when weight is placed on the affected foot. Athletes, such as ballet dancers and runners, have been known to be affected by cuboid syndrome as their particular physical activities can put strain on the cuboid bone. For a proper diagnosis, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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