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Monday, 14 September 2020 00:00

To Pop or Not to Pop (Your Blister)

If you have a blister on your foot, you may feel tempted to pop the fluid-filled pocket under your skin. Should you? The general consensus is that you probably shouldn’t. A blister is filled with serum, the liquid part of your blood that contains protective substances like antibodies. Popping or draining your blister removes the serum and makes a hole in your skin, opening the area up to infection. Popping the blister can also cause more pain than simply having an intact blister on your foot. Additionally, it is very important to avoid popping your foot blister if you have diabetes, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, swollen legs, venous ulcers, or a condition that affects your immune system, as these things can increase your chances of getting an infection. If you have a painful foot blister, it is recommended that you visit a podiatrist for treatment. 

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Blisters

Heel pain can be a common issue that a lot of runners experience. The style of your running stride, as well as overuse, can be factors in why you may be experiencing heel pain, however certain conditions may also be the cause. Fallen arches, or flat feet, as they're more commonly referred to, can create heel pain after a run due to the misshapen structure of the feet. The lack of an arch may put added stress or strain on the plantar fascia. The role of the plantar fascia is to connect the heel bone to the toes. If this tears, or becomes inflamed, another common heel condition known as plantar fasciitis may develop. For more information on what conditions may affect your heels, especially for runners, please consult with a podiatrist.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

What Causes Ingrown Toenails?

Ingrown toenails occur when the nail grows into the skin surrounding it. While they generally occur on the big toe, they can affect any toe. One common cause of ingrown toenails is the shape of the nail. This can be hereditary. Nails that become more broad at the top of the toes or nails that are naturally curly have a tendency to push into the skin. Trauma to the toenail or wearing shoes that are too tight can also lead to ingrown toenails. Signs of an ingrown toenail include redness around the side of the toe near the nail, swelling of the toe, and liquid seeping from the side of the nail. Because ingrown toenails are prone to infection, it is important to visit a podiatrist especially if an ingrown toenail persists.   

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor blood flow to the lower extremities. This is due to a buildup of plaque along the walls of the arteries, causing them to narrow and become stiff and thus restricting blood flow. According to a recent study, people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disorder that affects the joints, appear to be at an increased risk of developing PAD. Fortunately, both PAD and RA can be managed. A podiatrist can screen for PAD and recommend treatment options for both conditions. If you have poor circulation to your lower limbs or arthritic joint pain in your feet and ankles, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

Do I Have Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s neuroma can occur when nerve tissue swells or grows abnormally, causing damage to the nerves. Morton’s neuroma specifically affects the intermetatarsal plantar nerve found in the foot. Some symptoms of this condition may include a burning sensation in the ball of your foot and tingling, or a numbing feeling in your toes. The most popular symptom related to Morton’s neuroma is feeling as if a pebble is stuck in your shoe. For a proper diagnosis, please consult with a podiatrist if you believe you’re experiencing symptoms of Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Is Toenail Fungus Contagious?

Research has indicated that toenail fungus rarely affects children, but can develop as the aging process occurs. It occurs as a result of the fungus entering the toenail through a small crack in the nail, and will gradually spread when shoes and socks are worn throughout the day. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this ailment can consist of the toenails becoming thick and yellowed, and in severe cases, the nail may lift off of the nail bed. This type of fungus lives and thrives in warm and moist environments, and is often found in public swimming pools, showers room floors, and surrounding areas. It is helpful to wear appropriate shoes while in these types of places, as this may help to reduce the risk of spreading toenail fungus. Toenail fungus is considered to be contagious, and it is beneficial to refrain from sharing towels, socks and shoes. If you are afflicted with this condition, it is suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer you effective treatment options.

For more information about treatment, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it.

Antifungals & Deterrence

Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Applying foot powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Toenail Fungus

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition caused by the compression of the tibial nerve in your ankle. The tibial nerve can become compressed as the result of trauma, such as a fall, or from overuse. Tarsal tunnel syndrome might also arise as a complication following an ankle sprain or other lower limb injury, or following surgery. People who are diagnosed with diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis are at an increased risk of developing tarsal tunnel syndrome. The typical symptoms of this condition are a tingling, pins and needles sensation along the inner side of the ankle or foot, pain during extended periods of walking or standing, a burning sensation in the foot at night, and weakness in the muscles that bend the toes. If you are experiencing any symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

Help Improve Your Blood Circulation

Poor circulation is often a common issue among diabetic patients that can lead to issues with their feet. Neuropathy, for example, is one of the common conditions diabetic patients may face that causes poor circulation, making the feet feel numb. To help improve blood circulation, there are a few methods you can practice. Staying active, regularly stretching, reducing stress, and staying hydrated are all important methods in promoting healthy blood circulation. Certain foods may also help improve circulation such as fruits and vegetables, foods high in vitamin C, and spices such as garlic and ginger. For more advice on how to help issues with poor circulation in your feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM of New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Monday, 20 July 2020 00:00

What is Sever’s Disease?

Sever's disease is a common ailment experienced by active kids and teenagers, particularly between the ages of 7 and 14.  Sever’s disease causes pain when there is stress and inflammation where the Achilles tendon inserts into a growth plate of the heel bone.  Because running and jumping causes an increase in stress to the heel bone and growth plate, children and teens who participate in soccer, gymnastics, basketball, tennis, baseball, and football are at a higher risk.  If your child is complaining of pain in one or both heels that worsens with running or jumping, they may have Sever’s disease. It is highly recommended to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.  A podiatrist will be able to evaluate the heel bones and take X-rays during the physical examination.  If your podiatrist finds your child does have Sever’s disease, they will be able to help treat this condition and manage the pain as well.  

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 13 July 2020 00:00

Education for Podiatrists

Foot disorders are treated by doctors that are known as DPMs. These initials are an abbreviation for doctors of podiatric medicine. They can treat and correct foot conditions that may include hammertoes, heel spurs, plantar fasciitis, and diabetic foot ulcers. Additionally, they can provide custom-made orthotics which may be helpful in correcting abnormal foot function and structure. Podiatrists undergo an extensive education program, consisting of obtaining a bachelor’s degree, followed by enrolling in a podiatric school for four years. The learned topics can include anatomy, chemistry, and pharmacology. After graduating, many podiatrists choose to enroll in a residency program that can span from two to four years. If you would like to learn more about the role of a podiatrist, it is suggested that you speak with professionals who have chosen this career path.

If you are experiencing pain in the feet or ankles, don’t join the stubborn majority refusing treatment. Feel free to contact Michael Rosenblum, DPM from New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Podiatrist?

Someone would seek the care of a podiatrist if they have suffered a foot injury or have common foot ailments such as heal spurs, bunions, arch problems, deformities, ingrown toenails, corns, foot and ankle problems, etc.

Podiatric Treatment

A podiatrist will treat the problematic areas of the feet, ankle or lower leg by prescribing the following:

  • Physical therapy
  • Drugs
  • Orthotic inserts or soles
  • Surgery on lower extremity fractures

A common podiatric procedure a podiatrist will use is a scanner or force plate which will allow the podiatrist to know the designs of orthotics. Patients are then told to follow a series of tasks to complete the treatment. The computer will scan the foot a see which areas show weight distribution and pressure points. The podiatrist will read the analysis and then determine which treatment plans are available.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Fair Lawn, and Paterson, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is a Podiatrist?
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